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History of Temple Fortune

History of Temple Fortune
  • council: Barnet
  • phone code: 020
  • county: Greater London

Temple Fortune is a place in the London Borough of Barnet to the north of Golders Green. It is principally a shopping district used by residents of the Hampstead Garden Suburb. Between here and Golders Green, at Hoop Lane are two important Cemeteries.

The Jewish Cemetery and interred here are the remains of a number of famous people. The second cemetery is Golders Green Crematorium. There is a Police Station. To the west is a small Carmelite Monastery, and religious buildings include the Catholic church of St Edward the Confessor, and the Anglican Church of St Barnabas. There is a public house - The Royal Oak.

History
The earliest references to the name "Temple Fortune" is on a map (c1754). However this name reveals a much earlier history. It is likely that the name refers to the Knights of St John, who had land here (c1240). Fortune may be derived from a small settlement (tun) on the route from Hampstead to Hendon arrived at before arriving at Hendon. Here a lane from Finchley, called Ducksetters Lane (c1475), intersected. It is likely that the settlement was originally the Bleccanham estate (c900s). By the end of the 18th century Temple Fortune Farm was established on the northern side of Farm Close.

The building of the Finchley Road (c1827), replaced Ducksetters Lane as a route to Finchley, and resulted in the development of a small hamlet. Hendon Park Row (c1860s) is of this period, and consisted of around thirty small dwellings built by a George Stevens, which were, with two exceptions, demolished (c1956). A small dame school and prayer house run by Anglican Deaconesses existed in the 1890s and 1900s, which developed to become St Barnabas (1915). Along the Finchley Road was a number of villas (c1830s), joined by the Royal Oak public house (c1850s). By the end of the 19th century there were around 300 people living in the area, which included a laundry, a small hospital for children with skin diseases. The principle industry was brick making.

In 1895 a Jewish Cemetery was established adjacent of Hoop Lane, with the first burial in 1897. Golders Green Crematorium was opened in 1902 (although much of it was built after 1905). The significant moment in Temple Fortune's development into a suburban area occurred in 1907. The establishment of the Hampstead Garden Suburb brought major changes to the area east of the Finchley Road. Temple Fortune Farm was demolished, and along the front of the road, the building of Arcade, and Gateway House (c1911) established the Hampstead Garden Suburbs retail district. Also significant in that year was the opening of Golders Green tube station (see elsewhere). Although the area had been served by horse drawn omnibuses (since at least the 1880s) and later motor buses (from 1907), it was the tram line of 1910, connecting Church End Finchley with Golders Green Station, which led to the development of the area west of the Finchley road. The Carmelite Monastery was established in Bridge Lane in 1908.

St Edward the Confessor, a Roman Catholic church, was built in 1916. The now demolished Orpheum Theatre (1930), was intended to rival the Hippodrome in Golders Green.

Taken from Wikipedia

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